Is the atmosphere inside a Hummingbird nest relaxing or highstrung?

Is the atmosphere inside a Hummingbird nest relaxing or highstrung?

12 January, 2010 (16:16) | hummingbird nest | By: admin


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important, from admin.: read the third post down from Bill Hilton Jr. to get the correct facts about hummingbirds-thank you Bill for taking the time!  Be sure to visit his website!

How old do Hummingbirds live til?
Hummingbirds – weigh about 20 grams (correction-3 grams)each and have brains the size of a grain of rice (correction the size of a pea)– developed such memory to avoid wasting time and energy searching for food during their 3,200-kilometre annual migration from Canada to Mexico. Territorial hummingbirds’ brains may be wired to work on short time intervals . Anyway these birds mostly dine on nectar for their sugar fix and yes they would get high quite often just as the Koalas in Australia get high on gum leaves. I would say these birds are highly strung for sure. Don’t their wings beat something like 72 times in one second and they are smallish birds too and use so much energy so I would imagine the atmosphere in the nest would be pretty much “an upbeat (pardon the pun) whirlwind” but the chicks would be programmed by evolution to deal with their stressed out parent (the male has no part in raising the young) just wired to put up with it. If the parents could get them some ritalin maybe they would??? They can also fly at something like 90 mph in short bursts and something like 1000 heart beats per minute so there is a lot of energy being used quickly by these birds. Hummingbirds must consume at least double their own weight of liquid each day. I guess if I had to seek out and drink a comparable amount of liquid every day, I’d be pretty feisty too. They require this amount for all the energy they have in their small bodies. Actually reading a bit re these marvellous little birdies reminded me of the Tasmanian Devils which seem extremely manic and highly stressed too. I think the little birdies are in the nest quite a while – about a month and I guess their mum would be a nervous wreck but they need that vibe to get their own nervous vibes for their own futures as successful little hummingbirds. It’s a general rule of nature that the smaller the organism, the shorter its life span. Some hummingbirds, however, seem to defy this rule. It’s hard to imagine that a 3g Ruby-throated Hummingbird could actually survive the rigors of at least 17 migrational trips, to the tropics and back, and have a lifespan of nine years or more! These birds go into a state called “torpor” (to help them through long cold nights) where they can lower their body temperature (like a state of hybernation) and maybe they get a bit of rest doing this in the nest at night??

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Comments

Comment from Lisa
Time January 12, 2010 at 7:57 am

They rest when they enter their nests. The nests almost look like growths on a branch and are about the size of a quarter. I am sorry but I don’t remember how old they live to be.

All I do know is that the first time I saw one I thought it was a bug.
References :

Comment from veraswanee
Time January 12, 2010 at 8:44 am

Hummingbirds – weigh about 20 grams each and have brains the size of a grain of rice – developed such memory to avoid wasting time and energy searching for food during their 3,200-kilometre annual migration from Canada to Mexico.

Territorial hummingbirds’ brains may be wired to work on short time intervals .

Anyway these birds mostly dine on nectar for their sugar fix and yes they would get high quite often just as the Koalas in Australia get high on gum leaves.
I would say these birds are highly strung for sure. Don’t their wings beat something like 72 times in one second and they are smallish birds too and use so much energy so I would imagine the atmosphere in the nest would be pretty much "an upbeat (pardon the pun) whirlwind" but the chicks would be programmed by evolution to deal with their stressed out parent (the male has no part in raising the young) just wired to put up with it. If the parents could get them some ritalin maybe they would??? They can also fly at something like 90 mph in short bursts and something like 1000 heart beats per minute so there is a lot of energy being used quickly by these birds.

Hummingbirds must consume at least double their own weight of liquid each day. I guess if I had to seek out and drink a comparable amount of liquid every day, I’d be pretty feisty too. They require this amount for all the energy they have in their small bodies.

Actually reading a bit re these marvellous little birdies reminded me of the Tasmanian Devils which seem extremely manic and highly stressed too.

I think the little birdies are in the nest quite a while – about a month and I guess their mum would be a nervous wreck but they need that vibe to get their own nervous vibes for their own futures as successful little hummingbirds.

It’s a general rule of nature that the smaller the organism, the shorter its life span. Some hummingbirds, however, seem to defy this rule. It’s hard to imagine that a 3g Ruby-throated Hummingbird could actually survive the rigors of at least 17 migrational trips, to the tropics and back, and have a lifespan of nine years or more!

These birds go into a state called "torpor" (to help them through long cold nights) where they can lower their body temperature (like a state of hybernation) and maybe they get a bit of rest doing this in the nest at night??
References :
http://www.franceswood.net/humming.htm

http://www.cbc.ca/health/story/2006/03/06/hummingbirds060306.html
http://www.rubythroat.org/QuestionsAge01.html
http://girlscientist.blogspot.com/2005/09/hummingbirds-and-torpor.html

Comment from billhiltonjr
Time January 16, 2010 at 8:10 am

I am very disappointed this posting contains many errors and even contradicts itself. Because many people–especially young people–get information from the Internet, you are obligated to print facts–not wild speculation. Refer to the Operation RubyThroat Web site for factual information about hummingbirds.

In the next to last paragraph it states hummers weigh 3 g, which is correct; they DON’T weigh 20 g as stated in the lead paragraph.

Their brains are the size of a small green pea, not “a grain of rice.”

There is no evidence either baby birds or their parents are “stressed out” by the nesting process.

Anthropomorphizing and making human value judgments about wildlife serves no purpose except to spread misinformation.

There is no evidence hummingbirds “get high” on sugar they consume in flower nectar of from sugar water feeders.

Their wings typically beat about 60 times per second while hovering, perhaps twice that in fast flight.

There is no way a hummingbird could fly 90 mph. In steady flight they go 20-25 mph,; in a courtship dive up to about 40 mph.

They consume about their weight in food each day–not double that.

Eggs ar in the nest about 17-21 days; chicks are in the nest about the same length of time.

It would make no sense for a female on the nest at night to go into torpor. Her body temperature would drop and the eggs would cool and die.

Comment from admin
Time January 16, 2010 at 6:22 pm

thank you bill for pointing out the errors and making the corrections,they are appreciated!

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