hummingbird nest??

hummingbird nest??

31 December, 2009 (21:08) | hummingbird nest | By: admin


im doing a projects on humming and im comfuse
do humming bird built their nest only when they are laying eggs? if so can you tell me where they live when they dont lay eggs? thank you

Nests, for most birds, are like a "nursery" not a "bedroom" – they use them to lay eggs and raise their chicks, but for most of the year, they sleep in bushes and trees.

"The typical hummingbird nest is tiny, about the size of half an English walnut shell. The outer part is covered with moss and plant fibers. Sometimes it is shingled with lichens. The rest is made of plant down and spider webs." http://hummingbirdworld.com/h/nest.htm

"SLEEP: Hummingbirds roost with their necks pulled down, heads out and bills pointed up in the air." http://www.mschloe.com/hummer/printinfo.htm

" Where do hummingbirds live?
All hummingbirds are found in the Western Hemisphere. Hummingbirds occur in many different habitats, from the wettest to the driest, and from sea level to over 14,000 feet (4400 meters) in the Andes mountains.
How do they survive the winter?
One way hummers survive extreme conditions is called torpor. Torpor is a kind of deep sleep, whereby an individual hummingbird lowers its metabolism by 95%, and thus body temperature (normally around 104°F/40°C), to just above the point of death by hypothermia!

Hummingbirds are among the smallest of all warm-blooded animals and lack the insulating downy feathers typical of many other bird species. Due to this and their small body size, hummingbirds rapidly lose body heat to their surroundings. Even sleeping hummingbirds have large energy demands that they must meet simply to survive. Going into nightly torpor conserves a lot of energy, allowing the bird to survive very cold and hot nights. Awakening from torpor takes 20 minutes or more, and happens automatically about an hour before dawn.

Folks have reported finding “dead” hummers hanging upside down, in the morning; but these usually turn out to be individuals in deep sleep (torpid), that have somehow loosened their foot grip just enough to slip on the perch, but not fall. They eventually wake up and begin the daily routines. Other species known to go into torpor include swifts and swallows." http://www.naturalsciences.org/funstuff/faqs/hummers.html

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Comments

Comment from Kakariki
Time January 1, 2010 at 2:18 am

Hi lalalals. I’m not an expert on hummingbirds, as I live in Australia, but I know quite a bit about birds generally. I just googled hummingbirds and found out that, like most birds, they only build nests when they are breeding. When they aren’t breeding, they just sleep in trees and shrubs. Try googling ‘hummingbird nests’. Their nests are extremely small…some I saw were about the size of a thumbnail. Very cute.
Hope that helps.
References :

Comment from margecutter
Time January 1, 2010 at 2:47 am

Nests, for most birds, are like a "nursery" not a "bedroom" – they use them to lay eggs and raise their chicks, but for most of the year, they sleep in bushes and trees.

"The typical hummingbird nest is tiny, about the size of half an English walnut shell. The outer part is covered with moss and plant fibers. Sometimes it is shingled with lichens. The rest is made of plant down and spider webs." http://hummingbirdworld.com/h/nest.htm

"SLEEP: Hummingbirds roost with their necks pulled down, heads out and bills pointed up in the air." http://www.mschloe.com/hummer/printinfo.htm

" Where do hummingbirds live?
All hummingbirds are found in the Western Hemisphere. Hummingbirds occur in many different habitats, from the wettest to the driest, and from sea level to over 14,000 feet (4400 meters) in the Andes mountains.
How do they survive the winter?
One way hummers survive extreme conditions is called torpor. Torpor is a kind of deep sleep, whereby an individual hummingbird lowers its metabolism by 95%, and thus body temperature (normally around 104°F/40°C), to just above the point of death by hypothermia!

Hummingbirds are among the smallest of all warm-blooded animals and lack the insulating downy feathers typical of many other bird species. Due to this and their small body size, hummingbirds rapidly lose body heat to their surroundings. Even sleeping hummingbirds have large energy demands that they must meet simply to survive. Going into nightly torpor conserves a lot of energy, allowing the bird to survive very cold and hot nights. Awakening from torpor takes 20 minutes or more, and happens automatically about an hour before dawn.

Folks have reported finding “dead” hummers hanging upside down, in the morning; but these usually turn out to be individuals in deep sleep (torpid), that have somehow loosened their foot grip just enough to slip on the perch, but not fall. They eventually wake up and begin the daily routines. Other species known to go into torpor include swifts and swallows." http://www.naturalsciences.org/funstuff/faqs/hummers.html
References :

Comment from linda
Time May 4, 2015 at 4:54 pm

i have been fortunate enough to have had 12 nests in my trees on my patio.

it has been so inspiring to watch the nest building, the eggs hatch and actually see the babies fly off on their own!!!
i have a new mother hummingbird sitting on eggs now….whatever i have done to be so lucky i hope it continues.

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