Hummingbird Food?

Hummingbird Food?

31 December, 2009 (21:08) | hummingbird food | By: admin


I just put out a hummingbird feeder but if I run out of the necter that I bought, should or could I use something they like? I know they like red, so maybe Kool Aid since it is sugar? Or is that bad for them?

I had been using the nectar mixture for a few years, but today, when I was installing the feeder, I just did the sugar/water mixture. I have never had any hummingbird action like this before, I regret never having tried this before. BTW my feeder is transparent, and they are still hooked on the liquid anyway. I will never buy the store stuff again.

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Comments

Comment from Tor
Time January 1, 2010 at 2:15 am

Just plain sugar water is good.
References :

Comment from aattura
Time January 1, 2010 at 2:32 am

You need to use red-colored sugar water only.

Even honey is bad for them — honey gives them tumors.
References :

Comment from Joan H
Time January 1, 2010 at 2:44 am

I never buy hummingbird nectar, I make my own, using 3 parts water, to one part sugar. Boil the water, stir in the sugar, let cool and just put it in the feeder and sit back. No food coloring is needed. I live in Ohio, and they are in my feeder right now.
References :

Comment from beautiful blue eyes
Time January 1, 2010 at 3:07 am

You can easily make your own Hummingbird food using white sugar and water. There’s no need to add red food coloring to the Humming bird food recipe to attract Hummingbirds. Your red feeder will be enough to attract them. There is also controversy about whether food coloring might be harmful to the Humming birds, so avoiding it altogether might be the best choice.

The Hummingbird food recipe consists of 1 part white sugar to 4 parts water. This 1 to 4 ratio will closely match that found in actual flower nectar.

Start by stirring the sugar into the water while bringing the mixture to a boil over low heat. Boiling the solution is important as it helps remove chlorine from the water and kills mold and yeast spores that might be in the sugar.

Boil the mixture for two minutes and let cool. Do not boil any longer than 2 minutes or you will boil away too much of the water and change the ratio of sugar to water. I have read that higher sugar concentration resulting from boiling too long, will be more attractive to insects.

Once the Hummingbird food is cool you can add it to your feeder and store any excess nectar in the refrigerator (for 7 – 8 days) for use at a later date.

It is not necessary to completely fill your feeder. Only put in as much Humming bird food as you need to feed the number of Hummingbirds you have using your feeder. When it comes time to change the Humming bird nectar you don’t want to have a large amount left over to throw away.
References :
http://howtoenjoyhummingbirds.com/hummingbird%20nectar%201.htm

Comment from Louisiana Girl
Time January 1, 2010 at 3:49 am

just do sugar water.
The sugar you buy from the store and your water.
References :

Comment from Jerribear76
Time January 1, 2010 at 4:28 am

1 cup water
1/4 cup sugar
1-2 drops red food color

Mix water and sugar. Heat until sugar is dissolved. Add food coloring and let cool.
Pour into feeder and enjoy watching the hummingbirds!!
References :

Comment from Lavenderlady
Time January 1, 2010 at 4:48 am

I use 1/4 cup sugar to a cup of water. But I use distilled water I buy in the store and bring it to a slow warm to just melt the sugar. Let it cool and add to the feeders. That’s it. I do not add anything else and the birds love it.
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Comment from Marianne T
Time January 1, 2010 at 5:34 am

It is bad for them. Feed them the hummingbird nectar because it is closest to the nectar they would gather from flowers. You should get the dry nectar that you add water to and keep in your refrigerator. It’s handy and you will also have it on the shelf when you need it.
References :

Comment from birdgirl
Time January 1, 2010 at 5:54 am

the ONLY thing you should be using is sugar and water. They DO NOT need the red coloring, if the feeder is red….that is color enough to attract them. Boil 1 part water to 4 parts sugar. Cool, then add into feeder. The red coloring in the nectar you get at the stores is thought to be bad for them. It is said to cause build up in the liver and bladder failure.
References :
I am an ornithologist

Comment from blackpup
Time January 1, 2010 at 6:26 am

I had been using the nectar mixture for a few years, but today, when I was installing the feeder, I just did the sugar/water mixture. I have never had any hummingbird action like this before, I regret never having tried this before. BTW my feeder is transparent, and they are still hooked on the liquid anyway. I will never buy the store stuff again.
References :

Comment from Kels
Time March 16, 2011 at 9:37 pm

Just a comment about birdgirl the orthinoligist posting above. Do NOT follow birdgirl’s recipe for nectar. I’m sure she just made a typo, but you do NOT ever put four parts sugar to one part water. It should always be the other way around: four parts water to one part sugar. You don’t want to give the birds a sugar overdose. Also, yes, it needs to be changed daily in warm weather, sometimes twice a day if it’s really hot. In cooler weather, change it every other day. It ferments and turns into alcohol if you don’t change it and the birds get drunk. I had a hummingbird drink a lot at dust one time and it flew into the ground. Luckily, it re-oriented itself and flew off. I went to check the feeder, and it smelled of alcohol because the hot weather had changed it into a form of booze. I had a drunken bird! From then on, I only made small batches, put smaller amounts out, and changed daily. It’s more work, but worth it to keep the birds healthy. You also should scrub all parts of the feeder with pipe cleaners or whatever tools you need to get into crevices. Use baking soda and rinse well, making sure to get all the soda out.

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