I have planted petunias, butterflybush, bells, and put out a feeder;No hummingbirds? Why don't I have any?

I have planted petunias, butterflybush, bells, and put out a feeder;No hummingbirds? Why don’t I have any?

8 July, 2010 (00:40) | how to attract hummingbirds | By: admin


Anyone have suggestions on how to attract the hummingbirds?
I live in North Central Texas.
I have a feeder out with the nectar in it, and I am using the red nectar.
Feeder is in the shade, and cats can’t get to it. No cats around.

Be sure to change the nectar in the feeder frequently – it goes bad after a few days especially if the temperatures are hot. Also be sure to avoid use of pesticides because hummingbirds also eat insects.

I usually hang my feeders under the eaves of the house so it’s visible but in the shade and out of the reach of predators. I agree with other posters that suggest making your own nectar – one part cane sugar to 4 parts water and NO red food coloring is necessary.

They are more likely to come and stick around if you have LOTS of flowers that they like.

I don’t know if all of these will do well in Texas but here are some others that they love around my house:

Fuchsias – single flowered – not double
Lantana
Daylilies
Red Hot Poker
Hibiscus
Honeysuckle
Salvia
Trumpet vine
monkey flower
penstemon
nasturtium
Columbine
Delphinium
Hollyhock

There are probably many more that will grow in your area. Take a look at the native plants in your area that have flowers. It also seems to help if you can attract them early in the season with early blooming flowers (which may be winter time in your area), then they may find your yard when other food is scarce and get in the habit of visiting.

Good luck!

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Comments

Comment from Star
Time July 8, 2010 at 5:49 am

May just take a while depending where you live and their travel schedule. Hang in there.Sounds like you have done all the right things.Good luck.
References :

Comment from Rambo
Time July 8, 2010 at 6:38 am

They sell hummingbird birdseed. I’m not sure if that’s what you put in there, but it works well. Once the birds come for the first time, they’ll just keep coming back for more.
References :

Comment from Tex
Time July 8, 2010 at 7:26 am

Hummingbirds DO NOT go for seeds, only plant nectar or something resembling it. I live in East Texas, near Athens and we have them all over the place. I use the store bought nectar mix but a lot of people just use sugar and water mix. They are very cautious , nervous birds so make sure your feeders are up off the ground out of reach of cats, etc. somewhere out of the main flow of kids and pets. etc.
References :

Comment from wheelieman
Time July 8, 2010 at 7:36 am

put up a sugar and water feeder, and see if that works
References :

Comment from tropics11
Time July 8, 2010 at 7:43 am

The butterfly bush will attract them but when in full bloom. If your hummingbird feeder is in full sun the juice heats up burns their little tongues…..move to a shaded area and not where a cat can get up on something to get them either, fences, up in trees, lawn furniture.
References :

Comment from arkipelago2
Time July 8, 2010 at 7:57 am

I would advise against using store bought nectar. It usually contains red dye which can be harmful to them and is more costly. You can mix 1 part white cane sugar to 4 parts water. Do not use red coloring! usually your feeder has enough red on it anyway.
References :
http://www.network54.com/Forum/439743/

Comment from Karen L
Time July 8, 2010 at 8:33 am

Sounds like you’re doing all the right stuff, though I wouldn’t bother with the store-bought nectar. Making your own is simple and cheap and doesn’t feed dye to the birds. Do people around you have them? Do you notice them in your neighbourhood? Ask at a garden centre what the season for them is where you live. They come and go a bit through the season, following the flowers opening. I’m in British Columbia, Canada, and around here they arrive in early April and are gone by the end of August. If they aren’t around already, it might take a while for the birds to realize there’s eats at your house. Also, they vary a lot locally. I get about 4 pairs each year. A place a few miles away gets 20 at least.
References :

Comment from mickiinpodunk
Time July 8, 2010 at 9:12 am

As with feeding any bird species, they have to find out you’ve got food available before they will come to it. If you don’t do any other bird feeding, you may not have any close enough to attract yet. It takes time and trust to attract the birds. Don’t give up, be patient, put up more than one feeder, too. You may also want to make sure that the flowers you plant have large, red petals, too. They see the red. Bergamot is also a good hummer attractant, as are hanging fuschias. They aren’t big on low growing plants, though, so unless your petunias are in a hanging planter, they won’t feed from them, too low to the ground. Those birds are shy, though, and they do take some time to build up trust, but the first time you see one….
References :
Lifelong gardener, and we feed a lot of birds, including hummers here in New England.

Comment from LeeD
Time July 8, 2010 at 9:33 am

I have hummingbirds (not yet this year – too early) but they don’t seem to like my hummingbird feeder as much if there are flowers around that they can get nectar from.

Try planting some bee balm (monarda) – I have the red ones and the hummers love it! It doesn’t bloom until later in the summer and neither does the butterfly bush (at least here in NH) so that is when I really start seeing them. However, I do get some early on with the feeder. I usually have my feeder near some bushes or trees so the hummers feel "protected".
References :

Comment from Tori
Time July 8, 2010 at 9:38 am

Be sure to change the nectar in the feeder frequently – it goes bad after a few days especially if the temperatures are hot. Also be sure to avoid use of pesticides because hummingbirds also eat insects.

I usually hang my feeders under the eaves of the house so it’s visible but in the shade and out of the reach of predators. I agree with other posters that suggest making your own nectar – one part cane sugar to 4 parts water and NO red food coloring is necessary.

They are more likely to come and stick around if you have LOTS of flowers that they like.

I don’t know if all of these will do well in Texas but here are some others that they love around my house:

Fuchsias – single flowered – not double
Lantana
Daylilies
Red Hot Poker
Hibiscus
Honeysuckle
Salvia
Trumpet vine
monkey flower
penstemon
nasturtium
Columbine
Delphinium
Hollyhock

There are probably many more that will grow in your area. Take a look at the native plants in your area that have flowers. It also seems to help if you can attract them early in the season with early blooming flowers (which may be winter time in your area), then they may find your yard when other food is scarce and get in the habit of visiting.

Good luck!
References :
http://www.hummingbirds.net/

Comment from craig
Time August 20, 2013 at 10:05 pm

I have two desert willows in my yard and they love them. these trees are native to the socal desert

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